Parish Mission

Parish Mission

Our Parish Mission has been proving a great success!

Fr. Tom Sullivan of the Father’s of Mercy is conducting the Lenten Mission. Tonight, Thursday, March 23rd, we will have Confessions from 6:00 – 6:45pm, then Mass at 7:00pm, followed by a reception to meet Fr. Sullivan.  Confessions will resume if necessary after the reception.

“Fr. Thomas Sullivan was born in 1959 and is a native of Havertown, Pennsylvania. In 1998, Fr. Thomas became a member of the Congregation of the Fathers of Mercy. He is a 2004 graduate of Holy Apostles Seminary in Cromwell, Connecticut and was ordained to the priesthood in May 2004. Prior to his joining the Fathers of Mercy, Fr. Thomas owned and operated his own roofing company and worked extensively with the Missionaries of Charity throughout the world and with the Padre Pio Center in Barto, Pennsylvania.

“The Congregation of the Fathers of Mercy was founded in 1808, originally under the title of “the Missionaries of France.” The community was founded for the purpose of re-evangelizing the French people after the Catholic Faith had been subjected to years of attacks and persecution during the French Revolution. It is now exclusively an American community. The generalate is located in South Union, Kentucky. The primary apostolate of the Fathers of Mercy is to conduct parish missions and retreats throughout the country.

“During the mission, Fr. Thomas will encourage and challenge the parish community to make a stronger, deeper commitment to Christ, His Church and the Sacraments.”

Ash Wednesday

UPDATE:   We have one more Mass for Ash Wednesday, which is this evening at 7:00pm.  Ashes will be given out immediately following the Homily  

It’s difficult to imagine that Lent is already coming upon us this Wednesday. It also means that Mardi Gras is this Tuesday which will certainly be occupying the time of many, in various pursuits.

But come Wednesday, many people will be wanting Ashes.

So, here is the pertinent info:

The 1988 circular letter on Lent and Easter “Paschales Solemnitatis,” issued by the Congregation for Divine Worship states:

“21. On the Wednesday before the first Sunday of Lent, the faithful receive the ashes, thus entering into the time established for the purification of their souls. This sign of penance, a traditionally biblical one, has been preserved among the Church’s customs until the present day. It signifies the human condition of the sinner, who seeks to express his guilt before the Lord in an exterior manner, and by so doing express his interior conversion, led on by the confident hope that the Lord will be merciful. This same sign marks the beginning of the way of conversion, which is developed through the celebration of the sacraments of penance during the days before Easter.”

“1060. This order may also be used when ashes are brought to the sick. According to circumstances, the rite may be abbreviated by the minister. Nevertheless, at least one Scripture reading should be included in the service.”
Ash Wednesday is not a Holy Day of Obligation.

We will have three Masses:

 

  1. 6:30AM in the Extraordinary Form, at which Ashes are given out prior to Mass.
  2. 8:00AM our usual daily Mass, at which Ashes are distributed after the Homily.
  3. 7:00PM is the same as 8:00AM

Ashes will be given to ministers of the homebound; but they will not be distributed in the Office, or otherwise outside of Mass.

 

Have a great holiday!

+ Blessings

Third Sunday of Advent

Third Sunday of Advent

Third Sunday of Advent

Gaudete (Rejoice) Sunday! Light the third (rose-colored) candle on your Advent wreath.

On Gaudete Sunday, the season of Advent shifts its focus. For the first two weeks of Advent, the focus can be summed up in the phrase, “The Lord is coming.” But beginning with Gaudete Sunday, the summary might be, “The Lord is near.”

This shift is marked by a lighter mood and a heightened sense of joyous anticipation. Liturgically, the colors lighten as well. The priest usually wears rose-colored vestments, a hue seen only on Gaudete Sunday and Laetare Sunday.

In times when the focus of our anticipation is often on the negative and fearful, this celebration is a reminder that God who loves us is still in charge and that we await his coming not with fear, but with tremendous joy.

From the Gospel for the Day:

As they were going off,
Jesus began to speak to the crowds about John,
“What did you go out to the desert to see?
A reed swayed by the wind?
Then what did you go out to see?
Someone dressed in fine clothing?
Those who wear fine clothing are in royal palaces.
Then why did you go out? To see a prophet?
Yes, I tell you, and more than a prophet.
This is the one about whom it is written:
Behold, I am sending my messenger ahead of you;
he will prepare your way before you.
Amen, I say to you,
among those born of women
there has been none greater than John the Baptist;
yet the least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he.”

First Sunday of Advent

First Sunday of Advent

Following are some comments on the prayer of the Ordinary Form of the Mass, via the website of the US Conference of Catholic Bishops

First Sunday of Advent

Collect

Grant your faithful, we pray, almighty God,
the resolve to run forth to meet your Christ
with righteous deeds at his coming,
so that, gathered at his right hand,
they may be worthy to possess the heavenly Kingdom.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.

COMMENTARY

  • The increasing activity of the faithful comes to the fore in this translation, revealing the richness of the Latin prayer that dates to seventh-century Rome and Gaul.
  • The prayer begins with the gift of almighty God, but the way in which God gives is part of the gift. The Almighty elicits our cooperation in our own transformation.
  • At the beginning of the prayer we are described as Gods faithful. We affirm that we are praying.
  • Then the prayer offers a poetic reflection on our Christian lives. Our journey through life is described as running forth to meet Christ.
  • Along the way we accomplish righteous deeds by the grace of God. Even as we are on the way to this encounter, Christ is coming to meet us.Not only does this prayer describe our lifelong journey, but it also describes our journey this Sunday to come to the church building where Christ encounters us in his body the living Church, in the word proclaimed, in the ministers, and especially in the communion we share.
  • We are gathered at Christs right hand every time we journey to this encounter with Christ who comes to us not only in the liturgy but also in the least of our brothers and sisters. Our humble service of others in their need provides the righteous needs that accompany us to his coming. Then we process again, bringing our financial offerings so that with these the Church might continue its good works in society.
  • The Almighty elicits our cooperation in our own transformation so that by the gift of God we are deemed worthy to possess the heavenly kingdom. The Almighty elicits our cooperation in our own transformation so that by the gift of God we are deemed worthy to possess the heavenly kingdom.

Prayer over the Offerings

Accept, we pray, O Lord, these offerings we make,
gathered from among your gifts to us,
and may what you grant us to celebrate devoutly here below,
gain for us the prize of eternal redemption.
Through Christ our Lord.

COMMENTARY

  • Life with the Lord involves an ongoing, reciprocal exchange of gifts. This exchange occurs on two levels in this prayer, on the level of things given and of persons giving themselves.
    This prayer appears only once in the history of the liturgy, in a sixth century compilation of individual mass booklets developed in Rome, until the prayer was discovered and included in the 1970 Latin edition of the Roman Missal.
  • When the gifts of bread and wine and financial contributions are brought forward, the bread and wine are prepared and placed on the altar and this prayer is said over them.
  • The initial divine gift begins the exchange. The Lord gives life to all things and with human cultivation brings forth the grain and the grape from the earth. By the work of human labor we produce from the fruit of the earth the bread and wine offered at mass as well as food offered to the hungry in their need. The financial contributions offered may also be seen as human collaboration with the divine gifts, whether natural or human resources.
  • From these gifts that the Lord has given bounteously to us, we offer a portion in thanksgiving to share in communion and to share with our neighbor in their need. We ask the Lord to accept these gifts.
  • The second level of exchange occurs in this prayer when the Lord grants us to celebrate the liturgy devoutly and, by implication, to live life from the liturgy we celebrate. Our collaboration with God by responding to the divine gift is what gains for us eternal redemption. Rather than a simple reward given after death, eternal redemption in this prayer characterizes our way of living from the Eucharist we are given to celebrate.

Prayer after Communion

May these mysteries, O Lord,
in which we have participated,
profit us, we pray,
for even now, as we walk amid passing things,
you teach us by them to love the things of heaven
and hold fast to what endures.
Through Christ our Lord.

COMMENTARY

  • The prayer after communion looks back to offer a reflection on the communion we have just shared, and it looks forward to tell us how to conduct our daily lives in light of the Eucharist we have just celebrated.
  • This prayer was newly composed for the 1970 Latin edition of the Roman Missaland is based on two sixth-century Roman prayers that were subsequently lost to the liturgical tradition.
  • This prayer turns to the language of commercial exchange to indicate that in commerce with our Lord we derive the profit. Simple participation in the mysteries, however, does not bring about automatic profit. Participation needs personal reflection, which, accompanied with the ongoing gift of our Lord, is profitable to us.
  • As we prepare to return to our daily lives, our journey is described as a walk among passing things. Even passing things, however, are useful for divine instruction by which we learn to distinguish between the passing things and what endures. Once we have learned to distinguish between them, we learn to love the things of heaven and to hold fast to what endures.
  • The prayer does not say that we reject passing things nor does it describe things of this world in a negative light. Rather, the Eucharistic bread and wine we share, these are the enduring things of heaven, the body and blood of Christ. By sharing our daily bread in communion we learn as a community to value, hold fast and even to love the enduring things of heaven.
  • The communion we share informs our daily conduct as we learn to value even passing things as bearers of the enduring things of heaven.
Thanksgiving Day Mass – 8AM

Thanksgiving Day Mass – 8AM

Our Thanksgiving Day Mass is at 8AM.

The Bulletin wrongly states that the mass is at 10AM… So be there at 8AM as usual!

Many thanks to our Ladies Sodality for organizing our massive food drive for those in need. It’s a lot of hard work, but it is highly appreciated!

Thanksgiving Food Drive

Thanksgiving Food Drive

Yes, once again we have been collecting for Thanksgiving Food Baskets.   In fact, we give out more food baskets than just about anyone else on the Northshore, given our huge territory.

Please drop off items at the Office, and plan on helping with our Distribution Efforts the week of November 14-19, with the boxes being given out on the morning of November 19th.